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Convening Team

In 2020-2021 the three convenors of the Jurisprudence Discussion Group are Cécile Degiovanni, Sebastian Lewis, and Andreas Vassiliou. You can find out about previous convenors on our History page.


Cécile Degiovanni

I am a second-year DPhil student in Legal Philosophy. My thesis question is: when a person A has consented to a person B committing a crime against them, (when) should this consent make a decisive difference in a trial? In other words, (when) should consent be considered a legal justification? I was mainly trained in continental philosophy (Ecole Normale Supérieure of Paris; Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), analytical philosophy (EHESS; NYU and Oxford as a visiting student) and French law (Paris X Nanterre). I have also done internships in different jurisdictions (Conseil d'Etat, European Court of Human Rights, Paris Administrative Court, Orléans Appeal Court).



Sebastian Lewis

Sebastian joined the DPhil in Law Program in October 2017. His doctoral research focuses on legal reasoning and the theory of precedents, particularly on the demands of the rule of law on judicial decision-making. Sebastian is also interested in the philosophy of authority, practical reasoning, and the sources of law. His work is supervised by Timothy Endicott and Grant Lamond. Before coming to Oxford, Sebastian completed his Master of Laws at Harvard Law School and his Bachelor of Laws in Chile. Sebastian is a qualified lawyer in Chile.


Andreas Vassiliou

Andreas is a DPhil Law candidate in Jurisprudence at Corpus Christi College. He is supervised by Prof. Nicolaos Stavropoulos and his studies are generously supported by the AHRC (OOC DTP) – Corpus Christi Cowley studentship and the A.G. Leventis Foundation scholarship. The focus of his doctoral research is on legal norms and the ways that rules affect our normative reasons for action. He has taught the FHS Jurisprudence course for Brasenose College and Lincoln College, Oxford. His interests concern general and special jurisprudence, ethics, and the structure of normativity. Prior to his current research, he read for his LLB and his LLM in Philosophy of Law at the University of Athens graduating from both with distinction and at the top of the class. He then moved to Oxford for his MJur and graduated with distinction. For his undergraduate and postgraduate studies he received the kind support of seven scholarships (Antonios Papadakis, MFHR, SYLFF, Lilian Voudouri, Onassis, A.G. Leventis, and A. Gazis).